Eleven States Sue Obama Admin. over Transgender Directive

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Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, along with AG’s in 10 other states, are suing the Obama administration over the president’s directive to allow transgender students to use whatever bathroom that matches their gender preference.

The lawsuit is an attempt to make sure states can ignore the federal government’s mandate.

Ten other states are joining the lawsuit, including Arkansas, Oklahoma, Alabama, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Tennessee, Maine, Louisiana, Utah and Georgia.

The Obama administration has “conspired to turn workplace and educational settings across the country into laboratories for a massive social experiment, flouting the democratic process, and running roughshod over commonsense policies protecting children and basic privacy rights,” the lawsuit reads.

The Obama administration directive, sent earlier this month, threatened the loss of federal funds if it is not followed.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott confirmed the lawsuit before the attorney general’s formal announcement Wednesday.

“His lawsuit is challenging the way that the Obama administration is trampling the United States Constitution,” Abbott told reporters.

Supporters of the lawsuit argue, in addition to violating privacy and safety rights of women and children, the White House directive is a major overreach of power.

“I think the problem with the way the Obama administration has carried this out is that they haven’t candidly assed the cost of this type of policy,” attorney Gayle Trotter said on NPR.

“So we understand that women need privacy. They need safety in places that they frequent. And yet the Obama administration has decided to reinterpret an old law that never included transgender people for over 40 years,” she said.

Trotter said the president is doing this from a Washington one-size-fits-all edict instead of going through Congress and having a national discussion.

Some schools are now worried if they don’t comply they will lose funding.

“We don’t have a rule of law if we can reinterpret a more than 40-year-old law–and say that the plain language, the black letter of the law is meaningless because someone has become enlightened about it,” Trotter said. CBN.com


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