The Hecate Trinity, Statue of Liberty, The Christian/Babylonian Trinity

4 min


In this June 2, 2009 photo, the Statue of Liberty is seen in New York harbor. The crown is set to open July 4 after being closed since shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

What most people fail to realize is the “Statue of Liberty” is nothing more than a mammoth idol of the Hecate goddess an idol of her shown on the left. The Laginetan goddess may have had a more infernal character than scholars have been willing to assume.” In Ptolemaic Alexandria and elsewhere during the Hellenistic period, she appears as a three-faced goddess associated with magic, witchcraft, and curses. Today she is claimed as a goddess of witches and in the context of Hellenic Polytheistic Reconstructionism. Some neo-pagans refer to her as a “crone goddess”, though this characterization appears to conflict with her frequent characterization as a virgin in late antiquity. She closely parallels the Roman goddess Trivia.

pics11The “Hecate” goddess of Greek Mythology (on the left). Notice, she is a carbon copy of our “Statue of Liberty” as we will soon see below. An ancient Fertility goddess, also identified with Persephone, as Queen of Hades (underworld), and protector of witches.

The “Hecate” or “Hekate” is characterized as a Trinity, that existed within pagan mythology as a three faced goddess. The three faces represented the “Maiden”, the “Matron” (or Mother), and “the “Crone”.

The ancient concept of “The Trinity” most certainly affected the decisions of the ancient Roman Catholic church. What better way for Satan to overwhelm the True Hebrew Messianic movement by creating a Pseudo Greek-Roman Messianic movement called Christianity (Anti-Messianism). Trinitarians deny this, but facts are facts.

The Hecate Trinity was also associated with Diana. At her sacred grove at Aricia, on the shores of Lake Nemi a triplefold Diana was venerated from the late sixth century BCE as Diana Nemorensis. “The Latin Diana was conceived as a threefold unity of the divine huntress, the Moon goddess, and the goddess of the nether world, Hekate,” Albert Alföldi interpreted the late Republican numismatic image, noting that Diana montium custos nemoremque virgo (“keeper of the mountains and virgin of Nemi”) is addressed by Horace as diva triformis (“three-form goddess”). Diana is commonly addressed as Trivia by Virgil and Catullus.

The modern understanding of Hecate has been strongly influenced by syncretic Hellenistic interpretations. Many of the attributes she was assigned in this period appear to have an older basis. For example, in the magical papyri of Ptolemaic Egypt, she is called the ‘she-dog’ or ‘bitch’, and her presence is signified by the barking of dogs. In late imagery she also has two ghostly dogs as servants by her side. However, her association with dogs predates the conquests of Alexander the Great and the emergence of the Hellenistic world. When Philip II laid siege to Byzantium she had already been associated with dogs for some time; the light in the sky and the barking of dogs that warned the citizens of a night time attack, saving the city, were attributed to Hecate Lampadephoros (the tale is preserved in the Suda). In gratitude the Byzantines erected a statue in her honor.

As a virgin goddess, she remained unmarried and had no regular consort. Hecate has survived in folklore as a ‘hag’ figure associated with witchcraft. Strmiska notes that Hecate, conflated with the figure of Diana, appears in late antiquity and in the early medieval period as part of an “emerging legend complex” associated with gatherings of women, the moon, and witchcraft that eventually became established “in the area of Northern Italy, southern Germany, and the western Balkans.” This theory of the Roman origins of many European folk traditions related to Diana or Hecate was explicitly advanced at least as early as 1807. The Statue of Liberty is based on The Roman Goddess Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom. Originally as goddess of personal freedom, she later became the goddess of the Roman commonwealth.

goddess-artemis-2Greek equivalent: Ishtar (pictured on the right) is the Akkadian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess `Ashtart. Anunit, Astarte and Atarsamain,The goddess of fertility and sexuality. To the right is a picture of the Babylonian fertility goddess Ishtar (Easter in English). Ishtar is portrayed as a trinitarian god with Baal the Sun God/Tammuz the Sun of God/Ishtar the Queen of Heaven… this is where we get the Christian Trinity as incorporated into the “Christian Church” by the sun worshipping emperor Constantine at the Council of Niceae.

Lady Liberty, the goddess of witchcraft and the Statue of “Libertas or Liberty”. The Statue of Liberty is based on The Roman Goddess Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom. Originally as goddess of personal freedom, she later became the goddess of the Roman commonwealth. Greek equivalent: Ishtar is the Akkadian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess `Ashtart. Anunit, Astarte and Atarsamain,The goddess of fertility and sexuality. On monuments and seal-cylinders Inanna/Ishtar appears frequently with bow and arrow, though also simply clad in long robes with a crown on her head and an eight-rayed star as her symbol.

Moving right along, we find the other side of the story paints quite a different picture. In celebration of the centenary of the first Masonic Republic in 1884, the Statue of Liberty was presented to the Masons of America, as a gift from the French Grand Orient Temple Masons. The Masonic “Torch of Enlightenment” was also referred to as the “Flaming Torch of Reason”, by the Illuminati Masons in the 1700’s and in 1884, the cornerstone for the Statue of Liberty was placed in a solemn ceremony, by the Masonic lodges of New York.

Below is the cornerstone of the Statue of Liberty, dedicated to and by Freemasons.

plaque

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