The Roman Liturgy to St. Zita is a prayer to this corpse of Zita

3 min


The Bible is clear on life after death.

Ecc 9:5  For the living know that they shall die: but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory of them is forgotten.
Ecc 9:6  Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished; neither have they any more a portion for ever in any thing that is done under the sun.

This means, praying to a person who is dead is-well, talking to a corpse. Idolatry.

This is her story from Wikipedia

By her death, she was practically venerated by the family. After one hundred and fifty miracles wrought in the behalf of such as had recourse to her intercession were juridically proven, she was canonized in 1696.

Her body was exhumed in 1580, discovered to be incorrupt, but has since become mummified. St. Zita’s body is currently on display for public veneration in the Basilica di San Frediano in Lucca.

The official Roman Catholic website has this report 22.04.12:

 The Church’s liturgical veneration of St. Zita was introduced in the early 1500s, and confirmed by Pope Innocent XII in 1696. In 1580, her body was exhumed and found to be miraculously incorrupt. It is venerated today in the Basilica of St. Frediano, where she attended Mass during her life.

Source: CNA

She began her life as a peasant girl who went to work as a servant in Lucca at age of 12, and was known for her sunny demeanor, work ethic, and for giving leftover bread to the poor. After many years of working as a domestic, she was promoted to head housekeeper, and a series of miracles began to reward her hard work and piety. The story most often related concerns her distribution of bread to the poor. One day, as she was smuggling bread from the home of the family she worked for, a fellow servant ratted her out. When the head of the family pulled open her apron, instead of bread, only flowers fell to the ground. According to legend, when she died at age 60, the church bells spontaneously began to toll.

Following her death, her fame spread, becoming closely associated with the town of Lucca. She was mentioned by Dante in his Divine Comedy: Inferno, 21, v 38, in a passing reference that indicates he expected his audience to know who he was talking about.

In 1580, her body was exhumed and found to be incorruptible, and her body was put on display in a silver casket, as is tradition, in the church where she had prayed while alive. She was finally canonized in 1696. Although her body is claimed “incorruptible,” it is browned and wizened, most likely the result of a form of natural mummification. Only her hands and face are uncovered for viewing.

In 1988, her body was examined by Gino Fornaciari of the University of Pisa. His studies concluded that she had died of lung problems, probably associated with inhaling coal dust and smoke.

Every year on April 27, citizens of Lucca bake bread and bring flowers (often daffodils) to San Frediano in celebration of her feast day, and the saint is brought out to be touched by the pious. Her body is on display in a chapel on the inside right hand side of the church. Source

She is the patroness of domestic workers. Don’t you just love how the Catholic church comes up with solutions? This is a person brought into slavery since 12yrs and to keep other slaves motivated, they honor her for her patience. Other slaves (who catholic sources when referencing to the story call domestic workers) are taught to live by her example!

Here is the Catholic Prayer to Saint Zita

Prayer to Saint Zita

 Dear follower of the Son of God,

You desired to become a servant

And died the death of a slave.

You were not only a faithful maid-servant

But a practical lover of the poor.

Like Mary You could have said:

“Behold the handmaid of the Lord.”

Prompt domestics to be just and charitable,

Seeing in their employers children of God

And setting an example for them

as servants of God.

Source

Break away from the chains of the Roman Church. Break away from being a slave.

Rev 18:1  And after these things I saw another angel come down from heaven, having great power; and the earth was lightened with his glory.
Rev 18:2  And he cried mightily with a strong voice, saying, Babylon the great is fallen, is fallen, and is become the habitation of devils, and the hold of every foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean and hateful bird.
Rev 18:3  For all nations have drunk of the wine of the wrath of her fornication, and the kings of the earth have committed fornication with her, and the merchants of the earth are waxed rich through the abundance of her delicacies.
Rev 18:4  And I heard another voice from heaven, saying, Come out of her, my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues.
Rev 18:5  For her sins have reached unto heaven, and God hath remembered her iniquities.

 


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